Anger

“Nothing else makes such havoc in the lives of ordinary men and women as yielding to sudden fits of anger.

How sweet the serenity of habitual self-command. How many stinging self-reproaches it spares us!

When does a man feel more at ease with himself than when he has passed through a sudden and strong provocation without speaking a word, or in undisturbed good humor?

When, on the contrary, does he feel a deeper humiliation than when he is conscious that anger has made him betray himself by word, look, or action?

Nervous irritability is the greatest weakness of character. It is the sharp grit which aggravates friction, and cuts out the bearings of the entire human machine. ”

Orison Swett Marden, 1898

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