Swine flu information you may / or may not have read

Knowledge is power. Just be careful and make sure your children know these things to prevent problems.
This is not a panic post – just helps to know as “preventative” is better than “too late”. My father was 2 years old when the worldwide flu pandemic hit and millions died – 1918. China lost a million people in 1968. This may not be as horrible as these but take care!

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The best way to keep the disease from spreading, Besser said, is by taking everyday precautions such as frequent handwashing, covering up coughs and sneezes, and staying away from work or school if not feeling well. He said authorities are not recommending that people wear masks at work because evidence that it is effective “is not that strong.”
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Swine flu Q&A: What it is, symptoms, how to fight it

It’s a common respiratory ailment in pigs, but this strain appears to b ea subtype never before seen in pigs or humans. Here are answers to questions you may have about swine flu.

Q: What is swine flu?

A: It’s a common respiratory disease in pigs that doesn’t usually spread to people. When pigs catch this flu, many get quite sick, and 1% to 4% die, according to the World Health Organization. In the past, people have sometimes caught swine flu if they worked directly with pigs.

YOUR QUESTIONS: What do you want to know about swine flu? Ask here
STATE BY STATE: How officials across the USA are facing the threat
WHO: 40 U.S. cases confirmed
PHOTOS: Global citizens, travelers try to protect themselves

Q: How is this swine flu virus different?
FIND MORE STORIES IN: United States | White House | Minnesota | Mexico | North Dakota | World Health Organization | Elizabeth | Janet Napolitano | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A: This strain appears to be a subtype not seen before in humans or pigs, with genetic material from pigs, bird and humans, according to WHO. Unlike most cases of swine flu, this one can spread from person to person, said Richard Besser, the acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at a White House press conference Sunday. One of the confirmed cases in the USA caught swine flu from a spouse, who had been to Mexico.

Q: Were pigs the carriers of this virus?

A: It’s closer to say that pigs were the mixing bowl for this virus. Birds can’t pass bird flu to people. But pigs are uniquely susceptible to getting flu viruses that infect birds. Experts have long worried that a pig would catch a bird strain of the flu and then the virus would mutate inside the pig to a form that could also infect other mammals. That may be what happened in this case. Pigs can also be infected with more than one influenza virus at a time, allowing the viruses to share genes, called “genetic reassortment,” creating new and potentially much more virulent viruses.

Q: Can you catch swine flu from eating pork?

A: No, according to WHO. Pigs coming in to slaughter facilities are monitored for flu symptoms, and those that are ill are not allowed to enter the food supply. Cooking also kills the virus. People who work with pigs, however, can catch the virus. The Department of Agriculture is conducting tests to confirm that the food supply is safe, said Janet Napolitano, secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

Q: Is there a vaccine against swine flu?

A: No, but government scientists could try to create one, according to the CDC. “We’ve identified the virus,” Besser said. “Should we decide to manufacture a vaccine, we can work toward that goal very quickly.” CDC scientists don’t know if this year’s flu vaccine offers any protection.

Q: What about antivirals? Can they prevent swine flu?

A: This strain of swine flu does appear sensitive to the antiviral drugs Relenza and Tamiflu, but not to amantadine, or Symmetrel, and rimantadine, or Flumadine, Besser said. With normal seasonal flus, if taken within the first 48 hours after symptoms appear, antivirals can help people recover a day or two sooner. Doctors sometimes prescribe antivirals to household members of people with the flu to prevent them from getting sick.

Q: What are the symptoms?

A: The most common symptoms are fever, fatigue, lack of appetite and coughing, although some people also develop a runny nose, sore throat, vomiting or diarrhea, according to the CDC.

Q: What should you do if you have these symptoms?

A: Stay home from work or school, to avoid spreading your illness to other people, Besser said. Don’t get on an airplane. People should call their doctors to ask about the best treatment, but should not simply show up at a clinic or hospital that is unprepared for their arrival.

Q: How can people protect themselves?

A: As always, people should wash their hands frequently, Besser said. In the past, the CDC has said there isn’t conclusive evidence to support using face masks. Surgical masks are designed to prevent the wearer from spreading germs, but may also catch large respiratory droplets if someone sneezes nearby. In a 2007 statement, the CDC said these masks could be worn if someone needs to go to a crowded place, such as a grocery store, for a short time. N95 respirator masks filter out 95% of particles to prevent the wearer from breathing them in. These must be fitted properly around the nose to create a seal, so they can make breathing difficult.

Q: What does it mean for the government to declare a public health emergency?

A: While the declaration “sounds more severe than it is,” Napolitano said Sunday, it will free up funds and allow health officials to use medications and tests that aren’t normally used. The government also issued a public health declaration during recent floods in North Dakota and Minnesota, she said, and noted that the government often issues such declarations when hurricanes are approaching. The federal government is also releasing 25% of the 50 million doses of antiviral medications in the nation’s Strategic National Stockpile, Napolitano said. The Department of Defense is also making 7 million doses available.

Q: Why has the virus been so much deadlier in Mexico, where 1,300 have become ill and more than 80 people have died, than in the USA?

A: “What we’ve seen in this country is not anywhere near the severity of what we’re seeing in Mexico,” Besser said. Doctors don’t yet know why cases have been milder in the USA, where only person has been hospitalized, although 20 cases have been confirmed, Besser said.

By Liz Szabo, USA TODAY

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The best way to keep the disease from spreading, Besser said, is by taking everyday precautions such as frequent handwashing, covering up coughs and sneezes, and staying away from work or school if not feeling well. He said authorities are not recommending that people wear masks at work because evidence that it is effective “is not that strong.”
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A Timeline of Events in the Swine Flu Outbreak

Monday, April 27, 2009

— December 2005 to January 2009: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention receives reports of 12 cases of human infection with swine flu. Five of these 12 cases occurred in patients who had direct exposure to pigs and six reported being near pigs. Exposure in one case is unknown.

— March 28: Believed to be the date of the earliest onset of the swine flu cases in the U.S., Dr. Nancy Cox of the CDC said in an April 23 press briefing.

— April 2: A 4-year-old boy contracted the virus before this date in Veracruz state, Mexican Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordova later said citing test results. A community in Veracruz has been protesting pollution from a large pig farm.

— April 6: Local health officials declare a health alert due to a respiratory disease outbreak in the Mexican town of La Gloria in Veracruz state. Health officials record 400 cases of people who sought medical treatment in the previous week in the town. About 60 percent of the town of 3,000 are affected.

— April 17: CDC determines that two children in adjacent counties in southern California had illnesses caused by infection with swine flu. Both children became sick in late March.

— April 22: CDC confirms three additional cases of swine flu in California and two in Texas, near San Antonio.

— April 22: The Oaxaca Health Department indicates that 16 employees at the Hospital Civil Aurelio Valdivieso have contracted respiratory disease.

— April 24: Mexico’s Minister of Health confirms 20 deaths from swine flu, but 40 other fatalities were being probed and at least 943 nationwide were sick from the suspected flu. Mexico City shuts down schools, museums, libraries, and state-run theaters across the capital.

— April 26: The number of confirmed cases in the U.S. climbs to 20 in five states. Mexico reports suspect clinical cases have been reported in 19 of the country’s 32 states. Canada confirms six cases.

— April 27: The World Health Organization raises its pandemic alert status to Phase 4, meaning there is sustained human-to-human transmission of the virus causing outbreaks in at least one country.

Cordova said 1,995 people have been hospitalized with serious cases of pneumonia since mid-April and about half of those have been released. The government does not yet know how many were swine flu. The CDC reports the suspected death toll in Mexico has climbed to 149.

The number of confirmed cases in the U.S. climbs to at least 42 in five states.

Spain reports its first confirmed swine flu case.

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2 Responses to “Swine flu information you may / or may not have read”

  1. lifelessons4u Says:

    Very informative post. Thanks for sharing this info with us. It answered all my questions. A.

  2. Marsha J. O'Brien Says:

    My pleasure. Have a great day.

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