IF YOU LOVE YOUR DOG – “BLOAT” – the details

This is from the website that I found when I was struggling to find a vet and the reason my dog was suddenly, out of a clear blue sky, so very sick. I had never heard of this before, and I hope it never happens to your dog. Mine fit every symptom and it was heart-pounding and a rush to the vet. He is out of pain..twelve years of being loved – not too shabby, for the three of us!

http://www.globalspan.net/bloat.htm

“Bloat is a very serious health risk for many dogs, yet many dog owners know very little about it. According to the links below, it is the second leading killer of dogs, after cancer. It is frequently reported that deep-chested dogs, such as German Shepherds, Great Danes, and Dobermans are particularly at risk. This page provides links to information on bloat and summarizes some of the key points we found in the sites we researched. Although we have summarized information we found about possible symptoms, causes, methods of prevention, and breeds at risk, we cannot attest to the accuracy. Please consult with your veterinarian for medical information.

If you believe your dog is experiencing bloat, please get your dog to a veterinarian immediately! Bloat can kill in less than an hour, so time is of the essence. Notify your vet to alert them you’re on your way with a suspected bloat case. Better to be safe than sorry!

The technical name for bloat is “Gastric Dilatation-Volvulus” (“GDV”). Bloating of the stomach is often related to swallowed air (although food and fluid can also be present). It usually happens when there’s an abnormal accumulation of air, fluid, and/or foam in the stomach (“gastric dilatation”). Stress can be a significant contributing factor also. Bloat can occur with or without “volvulus” (twisting). As the stomach swells, it may rotate 90° to 360°, twisting between its fixed attachments at the esophagus (food tube) and at the duodenum (the upper intestine). The twisting stomach traps air, food, and water in the stomach. The bloated stomach obstructs veins in the abdomen, leading to low blood pressure, shock, and damage to internal organs. The combined effect can quickly kill a dog.

Be prepared! Know in advance what you would do if your dog bloated. If your regular vet doesn’t have 24-hour emergency service, know which nearby vet you would use. Keep the phone number handy.
Always keep a product with simethicone on hand (e.g., Mylanta Gas (not regular Mylanta), Gas-X, etc.) in case your dog has gas. If you can reduce or slow the gas, you’ve probably bought yourself a little more time to get to a vet if your dog is bloating.

This information is not intended to replace advice or guidance from veterinarians or other pet care professionals. It is simply being shared as an aid to assist you with your own research on this very serious problem.”

To check further on symptoms, please go to website I posted above. Knowledge is power. The information it doesn’t share is that if you opt for surgery…be aware: the surgery is VERY painful and the recovery is not guaranteed. It can happen again, and if it does there is no remedy. Buck was 12. We chose no more pain for him.

One Response to “IF YOU LOVE YOUR DOG – “BLOAT” – the details”

  1. Marsha J. O'Brien Says:

    You are welcome!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: